Pacman’s effect on behavior

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One of the best-known jokes Marcus Brigstocke (an English comedian, actor and satirist who has worked extensively in stand-up comedy, television and radio) uses is an ironic commentary on the controversy regarding the influence of video games on children: “ If Pac-Man had affected us as kids, we’d all be running around in dark rooms, munching pills and listening to repetitive electronic music. ” This joke is frequently quoted on the internet and often attributed to famous figures in electronics (such as an apocryphal CEO of Nintendo, “Kristian Wilson,” although Hiroshi Yamauchi held that position from 1949 to 2002). What do you think of that joke? Is it funny to you? do you think there is some sort of truth behind it?

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3 thoughts on “Pacman’s effect on behavior

  1. What do you think? Should we continue to fully blame violent games for the increase in aggressive behaviors? On the other hand, we need to remember that games 30 years ago were quite different (not that advanced, realistic) than today.

    • As proven by many researches and also as discussed in class, I do not think video games cause any effect on aggression, especially games like PacMan. However, If a person has other problems in life, video games somehow might result in the person becoming more aggressive (although I am not quite sure how). Yet again, that all depends on the person, his background, childhood, and personality.

      We can safely assume that 30 years ago levels of aggression in children were lower than what they are right now, many studies have showed that. Nevertheless, we can not blindly blame this rise in aggression on (violent) video games. As I mentioned before, video games might only act as a trigger for a rise in aggression based on past experiences of the player. Perhaps parents nowadays blame video games for rise in aggression as a way to run away from being held responsible for that aggression.

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